Publications

Restorative Value of Nature and Skylines in Daylight and After Dark  (2013)

Authors:
Jack Nasar; Margherita Pasini; Stephen Perry; Roberto Burro; Anna Paolillo
Title:
Restorative Value of Nature and Skylines in Daylight and After Dark
Year:
2013
Type of item:
Contributo in volume (Capitolo o Saggio)
Tipologia ANVUR:
Contributo in volume (Capitolo o Saggio)
Nations of authors:
STATI UNITI D'AMERICA; ITALIA
Language:
Inglese
Format:
Elettronico
Book Title:
Proceedings of the 44th Annual Conference of the Environmental Design Research Association
Publisher:
The Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA)
:
McLean, VA
ISBN:
9781300925415
Page numbers:
295-296
Keyword:
Restorativeness, Natural environments, Urban skylines, Environments after dark
Short description of contents:
If people respond to nature environments more in a biological mode and urban environments more in a cultural/experiential mode, then responses would vary less between cultures in response to natural environments than to urban environments. To study this, we had participants from the U.S. and Italy rate each of 32 environments shown in color slides. The environments included eight natural environments and eight urban environments (skylines)including two historical onesphotographed during the day and night. Although natural environments during the day should be restorative, after dark they have properties that should evoke uncertainty and fear and should thus reduce restorativeness. Historical environments should also have restorative value, as might skylines after dark (Nasar & Terzano, 2010). Participants rated each environment on the five-item Perceived Restorativeness Scale (Berto, 2005). The five items had high inter-item reliability. Using the composite scale, the analysis supported the view that responses to nature were more biological and responses to urban environments were more cultural or experiential. Both U.S. and Italian participants had similar scores for that natural environmentsrating day nature as restorative and night nature as non-restorative but they differed in their ratings of the skylines. U.S. participants rated the skylines as higher in restorativeness than did the Italian participants. Though both groups judged the historical skylines as restorative, cultural differences emerged for the historical skylines as well. Although research indicates that responses to color photos should generalize well to on-site experience, we believe it worthwhile for studies to obtain on-site responses to these kinds of environments. In addition, we recommend that studies employ other measures (including psycho-physiological measures), environments, and groups to find out the degree to which responses to these kinds of environments derive from biology or culture. For urban design, the findings highlight the importance of considering both the socio-physical context.
Web page:
http://www.edra.org/sites/default/files/pdfs/EDRA44Proceedings_FINAL_WEB.pdf
Product ID:
84694
Handle IRIS:
11562/873445
Deposited On:
January 16, 2015
Last Modified:
November 2, 2016
Bibliographic citation:
Jack Nasar; Margherita Pasini; Stephen Perry; Roberto Burro; Anna Paolillo, Restorative Value of Nature and Skylines in Daylight and After Dark Proceedings of the 44th Annual Conference of the Environmental Design Research AssociationMcLean, VAThe Environmental Design Research Association (EDRA)2013pp. 295-296

Consulta la scheda completa presente nel repository istituzionale della Ricerca di Ateneo IRIS

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